Counting Down To 25 - Street Cry Wins The Seventh Running Of The Dubai World Cup In 2002

The Dubai World Cup meeting celebrates its historic 25th anniversary on March 27, with six Group 1 races and three Group 2s, including one of the world's premier races, the $12 million Dubai World Cup, sponsored by Emirates Airline.

Over the next three weeks, we will pay tribute to each of the previous Dubai World Cup winners. Today, we rewind to 2002 when Street Cry gave jockey Jerry Bailey his fourth and trainer Saeed bin Suroor his third Dubai World Cup title.

Champion American jockey Jerry Bailey collected his fourth victory in what was the world’s richest race as the Godolphin owned and Saeed bin Suroor-trainee Street Cry dominated in the seventh running of the US$6,000,000 Group I Dubai World Cup.

Street Cry’s success gave Bailey his fourth win in the event after Cigar (1996), Singspiel (1997) and Captain Steve (2001). “It’s great to have won this race four times but it’s because I have had some nice horses to ride,” Bailey commented after the win, while for Saeed bin Suroor it was his third success after Almutawakel (1999) and Dubai Millennium (2000).

The seventh running of the Dubai World Cup proved to be a triumph for Middle East-based horses as the first five over the line were trained in either the United Arab Emirates or Saudi Arabia with the Japanese runner Agnes Digital the best from outside the area, finishing sixth. Bailey secured the ride on Street Cry after Godolphin stable jockey Frankie Dettori opted for Sakhee (winner of the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe). That horse finishing third, over eight lengths away from the winner.

Street Cry was allowed to settle midfield on the inside of Sakhee and as the field approached and rounded the home turn. Sakhee went around the early leaders Western Pride and To The Victory, while Bailey had no hesitation in keeping to the fence on Street Cry. Sakhee got to the front momentarily, however Street Cry grabbed him quickly and then kicked clear. Sakhee was beginning to labour as Street Cry got a winning break at the 200m and it was Saudi Arabia’s Sei Mi (fifth to Captain Steve in the 2001 Dubai World Cup) who came from last to finish second, four and a quarter lengths away.

Street Cry went to America and appeared certain to dominate after an impressive performance to win the Grade I Stephen Foster Handicap at Churchill Downs before a second in the Grade I Whitney at Saratoga, and then injury unfortunately brought a premature retirement to Jonabell Farm.